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No. 6/1992

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Contents of no. 6/1992


Cover Picture: Maurice Raphaël: La pipe en terre. 1991.



Bernd Standke:
Clay-pipe finds in Freiberg

Rüdiger J.J. Articus:
A pipe bearing masonic symbols

Edward Zimmermann/Martin Kügler:
Maker's marks on pipes from the clay-pipe factory at Rostin

Andreas Eiynck:
A clay-pipe factory in Aschendorf near Papenburg

Reg Jackson/Philomena Jackson:
International Clay-Pipe Research - "The Society for Clay Pipe Research"

Pieter Smiesing:
Clay-pipe finds in Hamburg

Notice

Book reviews

Recent publications

 

 
Seitenbeginn
 

No. 6/1992, p. 1-11
Bernd Standke: Clay-pipe finds in Freiberg

An account is given of clay-pipe assemblages which were found during excavations in the centre of Freiberg, Saxony. Most of the pipes are imports from Gouda or 18th century pipes modelled on Gouda types. It is clear from a few specimens dating from before 1700 that pipes were smoked in Saxony as early as this. Some pipes have ornamentation and inscriptions which suggest that they were manufactured specially for Saxony; in one case a pipe bowl shows two miners and the word "FREIBERG". Unfortunately, we don't yet know where the pipes were made (apart from Gouda); however, Altstadt-Waldenburg, which is near Freiberg, is one possibility. A "coffee-house" pipe (19th century) was possibly made in the Westerwald.

Pipe with heel showing coat of arms of Great Britain, Waldenburg, mid 18th century
Heelless ribbed pipe with mark '6', Saxony, mid 18th century
Pipe with heel, shows two miners smoking and the inscription FREIBERG, probably from Saxony, 18th century

 

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Tonpfeife mit Freimaurersymbol

No. 6/1992, p. 12 ff.
Rüdiger J.J. Articus: A pipe bearing masonic symbols

A clay pipe found at Bullenhausen, Harburg district, shows the masonic insignia on the bowl. There was a freemason's lodge in Harburg and it is possible that this pipe belonged to one of the members. The symbols, however, are not specifically connected with one particular lodge. The pipe is closely comparable with specimens from Holland and the Westerwald, and a more or less identical model is figured in catalogues of several clay-pipe factories from there.

 

Two pipes showing Masonic symbols,
provenance unknown, 1890-1940
  

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No. 6/1992, p. 15-20
Edward Zimmermann/Martin Kügler: Maker's marks on pipes from the clay-pipe factory at Rostin

An account is given of the marks used in the clay-pipe factory at Rostin in Poland (then in Prussia). The factory began production just before 1750. Business didn't begin to flourish until around 1755 when a merchant called Isaac Salingre or Salinger acquired the factory. The shape of the pipe bowls and the marks were modelled on Gouda pipes, but the inscriptions on the pipe stems normally give the (correct) maker's name. All marks known so far that were used in this factory between 1750 and the beginning of the 19th century are figured.

Clay pipes from the factory in Rostin (see inscription), second half of 18th century

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No. 6/1992, p. 21 f.
Andreas Eiynck: A clay-pipe factory in Aschendorf near Papenburg

The clay-pipe factory in Papenburg mentioned in KnasterKOPF No. 3/1990, p. 31, can now be described in more detail. The factory was situated in Aschendorf near Papenburg, but nothing remains of it today. Documentary evidence shows that it existed at least between 1832 and 1905. Nothing is known yet about the products of the factory.

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No. 6/1992, p. 22 f.
Reg Jackson / Philomena Jackson: International Clay-Pipe Research - "The Society for Clay Pipe Research"

European clay tobacco pipes were first produced in England during the late 16th century. Thus it is appropriate that England should have been the birthplace of some of the earliest researches on the subject of clay pipe production. In 1974 the publication of Adrian Oswald´s book "Clay Pipes for the Archaeologist" acted as an inspiration for many people to untertake research in their own areas to find historical data about when and where pipes were produced, who made them, and how they were manufactured and distributed. So the Society for Clay Pipe Reseach was founded in 1983 following the production of a trial Newsletter. The SCPR now has about 150 members worldwide and membership is open to all those who are interested in the study of clay tobacco pipes.

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No. 6/1992, p. 24-33
Pieter Smiesing: Clay-pipe finds in Hamburg

   

Clay-pipe fragments from an excavation on the Venusberg (Böhmkenstrasse), Hamburg, were given to the author in 1981. On the basis of dates on the associated earthenware plates, and from the lack of a Gouda coat-of-arms mark on the pipe bowls, the pipes are dated between 1713 and 1739. They were probably made in Gouda. The unusually large size of some of the bowls is not incompatible with this, and may point to an exception to Friedrich´s theory of continually increasing volume of the bowl with decreasing age. The group includes a black-fired pipe, which is a rare occurrence.

 

Pipes with heel, the lips of the bowls show rouletting,
probably Gouda, beginning of 18th century
 
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last update: 2008-06-06