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Contents of no. 14/2001

Cover picture: Glazed clay pipe with portrait of "Marianne" by Jean-Michel Coquet; photo Ruud Stam.



Dear readers ...

Conference reports

Ralf Kluttig-Altmann:
Report on the 14th Meeting of the German Society for Clay-Pipe Research held on 1-4 June 2000 in Liestal, Switzerland
     

David Higgins:
The "Society for Clay Pipe Research"

Ruud Stam:
The "Pijpelogische Kring Nederland"

 
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Research news

Martin Kügler:
A mould for clay pipes?
Comments on a find in Heidelberg

Helmut Szill:
Clay pipes from Erding. Part I

Herbert Böhmer:
Documentary evidence on clay-pipe makers in Passau

Rüdiger Articus:
Clay-pipe finds from the Mellingburg wier on the River Alster

Ralf Kluttig-Altmann / Martin Kügler:
Observations on the roll-on technique used for pipe-stem decoration.
With a contribution from Martin Kügler

Ruud Stam:
Clay pipes and politics: the importance of the political pipe in the 19th century

Walter Morgenroth:
The secret of the genuine Schemnitz tobacco pipes

New finds

Rüdiger Articus:
Two "kluchtenpijpen" from Hamburg

Hermann Kewel:
Clay-pipe finds from the lower Weser and the Hamme

Hans Peter Schweickert:
Clay-pipe finds from Schloss Weferlingen

Rüdiger Articus:
Reports on clay-pipe manufacture in Lower Saxony between1835 and 1839

Rüdiger Articus:
Notes on clay-pipe manufacture in Nienburg


Recent publications

Book reviews

Bibliography of recent publications


Notice

Franz Wandinger: "Smoke signals" in German museums, Part 1

Notice / Forthcoming conferences

 
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No. 14/2001, p. 4-7
Ralf Kluttig-Altmann: Report on the 14th Meeting of the German Society for Clay-Pipe Research held on 1- 4 June 2000 in Liestal, Switzerland

The Society was invited to hold their meeting in Liestal by the Archaeological section and Museum of the Canton of Basel Land. Sixteen members from Germany, Holland, and Switzerland attended. M. Schmaedecke, the organiser of the meeting, gave an account of the use of clay pipes in Switzerland as well as his ideas on the typology of floral decorations on 17th century pipe stems. K. Rudin reported on finds of Gambier pipes, and M. Weidner on clay pipes from the River Elbe. R. Articus gave a historical review of clay-pipe research, and R. Stamm interpreted political motifs on clay pipes. R. Klutttig-Altmann reported on the results of his work on systematic typology of rolled-on stem decorations. M. Kügler described a mould for a pope bowl dated between 1619 and 1622 found in Heidelberg.       - more -

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Pipe mould, outside (top) with "IA" or "JA" scratched on, and inside (bottom)
 

 

No. 14/2001, p. 9-13
Martin Kügler: A mould for clay pipes? Comments on a find in Heidelberg

The author gives his interpretation of the purpose of a small mould with a hollow to fit one half of a pipe bowl, which was found during excavations in 1986/87 at No. 74 Untere Neckarstrasse in Heidelberg. The mould could not have served to make a real pipe bowl of a smokable pipe, but for a solid object shaped like a pipe bowl. This object might have been part of a larger model. The other finds in the assemblage indicate that the mould was made and used in 1619 by Joost Affsers, a potter and glazed-brick stove builder. The shape of the pipe bowl and the decoration engraved in it are similar to those on pipes from England and the Netherlands made in this period.


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Pipe with heel but with no decoration or mark,
late 17th century

 

No. 14/2001, p. 13-20
Helmut Szill: Clay pipes from Erding. Part I

In almost 20 years of collecting on fields around Erding, the author has found almost 4000 clay-pipe fragments, about 80% of which date from the mid to late 17th century. There is as yet no evidence for the existence of a regionally important clay-pipe industry in what is now the State of Bavaria in this period. Thus, it is not impossible that clay pipes were imported from the Netherlands. The provenance of these rather roughly made pipes is therefore still matter of conjecture. In Part I of this paper an account is given of the historical background to the occurrence of large quantities of clay pipes in Erding. Then three of the eleven groups of clay-pipe fragments are dealt with. These finds show a close resemblance to the clay-pipe assemblages found in Passau and in the Salzburg Land, which have already been described. In Part II of the paper clay-pipe fragments with relief decoration and those bearing the maker's initials are dealt with.

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No. 14/2001, p. 20-26
Herbert Böhmer: Documentary evidence on clay-pipe makers in Passau

Archives research has enabled the author to identify three clay-pipe makers in the Ilzstadt district of Passau and to locate where they lived. From this information it is clear that clay-pipe manufacture was begun in Passau in 1716 by Johann Stiegler (active until 1738). Other clay-pipe makers were Johann Geissler (1723-1777) and Johann Kollmann (1777-1800?). Although we know where these men lived, no clay-pipe fragments have yet been found at these sites. However, finds at another potter's house can be associated with one of the above clay-pipe makers. It is surprising that this study has not helped to identify any Passau clay-pipe maker's products amongst the rich finds from the Veste Oberhaus.


Part of bowl and stem of a green-glazed pipe,
end of 17th century

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Fragment of pipe stem with floral decoration, provenance unknown, around 1700

 

No. 14/2001, p. 26-31
Rüdiger Articus: Clay-pipe finds from the Mellingburg wier on the River Alster

Clay-pipe fragments picked up in the area around the former Mellingburg wier are 18th century products, which show a wide range of provenance. Many originate from the Netherlands, and others from Altona, Itzehoe (?), Uslar, Grossalmerode, Walbeck and Holzminden (?).

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No. 14/2001, p. 32-49
Ralf Kluttig-Altmann: Observations on the roll-on technique used for pipe-stem decoration. With a contribution from Martin Kügler

Our work on the typology of manually rolled-on decoration on pipe stems has shown that it is essential to first have a detailed knowledge of the techniques used to produce this decoration by means of a die, a roll-on die, etc. Historical technological descriptions tend to provide hardly any details of this aspect of clay-pipe production, or the descriptions are just incorrect. Tools for this purpose are very rarely preserved. Thus, the only way of obtaining information about the methods and the tools used is to make very detailed observations on the clay-pipe stems themselves. Many of the pipe-stem decorations are figured to help readers to classify their own material.


Tool for impressing decoration on pipe stem, Hilgert, Westerwald

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Portrait pipe of Abd el-Kadir, made by Blanc Garin, Givet, around 1850

 

No. 14/2001, p. 50-53
Ruud Stam: Clay pipes and politics: the importance of the political pipe in the 19th century

The author shows how often throughout the whole period during which clay pipes were smoked (17th to 20th centuries) a smoker could demonstrate his political affinity by means of a special motif on his clay pipe. The acme of this type of political identification was during the second half of the 19th century, when no longer only well known historical figures but also contemporary monarchs and politicians were increasingly portrayed on pipes. These pipes portraying people mostly came from France (the firm of Gambier) but were copied in Gouda although in insufficient quantity to meet demand. Although there were other every-day objects on which certain personalities or slogans could be portrayed, the political pipe, as a common mass-produced article, occupied an important place in 19th century political life, an almost exclusively masculine world.

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No. 14/2001, p. 53-60
Walter Morgenroth: The secret of the genuine Schemnitz tobacco pipes

Pipes manufactured in the clay-pipe making town of Schemnitz (Banská `tiavnica) in Slovakia had a characteristically narrow cylindrical bowl and enjoyed considerable popularity in the 19th century and at the beginning of the 20th century. These pipes were copied in many places and called Schemnitz pipes. As a consequence it is very difficult to distinguish a genuine Schemnitz pipe from a copy. The author provides information from old trade exhibition catalogues about pipe manufacturers who competed with those at Schemnitz.

 

Schemnitz stub-stemmed pipe made by Michael Honig around 1860   
 
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last update: 2008-06-06